The Federalist Regulations: The EPA and the Rush to Regulate Methane

By Joe Moeller* In May of 2016, the Environmental Protection Agency issued the final rules in a series of three Clean Air Act regulations.[1] The rules’ purpose was to increase monitoring of methane and prevent leakage into the atmosphere. The methane rules are also a useful, though flawed, example of the “experimentation” principle of federalism. […]

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International Aviation and Climate Change

I. Introduction International aviation presents a serious issue when it comes to climate change. Two percent of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions can be attributed to international flights, and the amount of CO2 emissions from these flights is growing rapidly.[1] From 1990-2010 CO2 emissions from the international aviation industry increased 40%; if the aviation sector […]

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Cap or Indicator? Is the Texas Education Agency Helping or Hurting our Special Education Population?

By Irma Cruz* The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), originally called the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, is the federal law governing special education. Congress enacted IDEA because millions of students with disabilities were being denied proper educational services.[i] IDEA’s mission is to provide all students who have disabilities with an “appropriate […]

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Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act

By Megan Stamm* Overview On October 14, 2016, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services released the final version of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA).[1] The new version implemented changes that addressed issues physicians had concerning Medicare.[2] These regulations will encourage physicians to accept more patients using Medicare by issuing incentive plans. […]

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Will Congress Warm-Up to HFC Refrigerant Replacements?

By Michael Smith* One of life’s ironies is that the machines that cool our homes, cars, and workplaces rely on chemicals that, when released into the environment, are greenhouse gases thousands of times as potent as carbon dioxide.[1]  These chemicals are called hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs for short), and in a late environmental victory for the Obama […]

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